Things Are Not What They Seem

Gallery trip to London, our group covered 17 private galleries in 1 and 1/2 days! A common theme that I picked up on is “Things are not what they seem!”. I particularly liked the work of Matt Johnson at the Alison Jacques Gallery.  I liked his humour and quirkiness. My favourite piece was an arch of scrunched up papers which looked they had been glued together. The sculpture was standing on 3 sheets of A4 paper and he had signed one of them in pencil.  The work is actually made from brass, solder and paint and no paper or glue!!

Paper Sculpture 2 (Arch) 2013 by Matt Johnson

Paper Sculpture 2 (Arch) 2013 by Matt Johnson

I also like this piece which looks like it is carved from polystyrene but is made from bronze with patina and paint.

Python Attacking a Bull 2013 by Matt Johnson

Python Attacking a Bull 2013 by Matt Johnson

There is something fascinating about something that looks like one thing but is actually another.

I also liked the Hauser and Wirth South Gallery Re-View Onnasch Collection exhibition of Pop Art by Jim Dine and Claes Oldenburg. Oldenburg’s giant  ‘Model for a Mahogany Plug, Scale B’ is a magnification of an everyday object to fantastical proportions so it no longer looks like what it is.

Claes Oldenburg, Year ?' Model for a Mahogany Plug, Scale B'

Claes Oldenburg, Year ?’ Model for a Mahogany Plug, Scale B’

We visited the Timothy Taylor Gallery to an exhibition of four artists instumental in the evolution of post-war European abstraction – Hantai, Hartung, Soulages, Tapies. I enjoyed trying to work out what techniques had been used particularly in the work of Simon Hantai (b. 1922 d.2008). He created huge canvasses with his ‘pliage’ method of folding. He used acrylic and oil paints with a combination of masking and folding.

Simon Hantai, Étude, 1968, Oil on Canvass

Simon Hantai, Étude, 1968, Oil on Canvas

Section of Blanc by Hantai 1968i
Section of Blanc by Hantai 1968

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About Marion's Eye

Photographer & Mixed Media Artist
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